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OUR BOOK OF THE MONTH IS BEAUTIFUL WORLD, WHERE ARE YOU BY SALLY ROONEY
OUR BOOK OF THE MONTH IS BEAUTIFUL WORLD, WHERE ARE YOU BY SALLY ROONEY

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  • Sold out
    William Max Nelson, Karen Holmberg, Garret Keizer, Patrick McGuinness, Dasha Shkurpela and Laura Esther Wolfson

    Five Ways Of Being A Painting

    $30.00

    Covering an array of subjects, from the meaning of art to supermarket shopping, these pieces were chosen for their originality, literary style, and above all, their ability to persuade. The judges awarded the first prize to “Five Ways of Being a Painting” by William Max Nelson for “its curious mix of the philosophical and the personal, the argumentative and the ruminative, that makes it a real essay.” The biennial Notting Hill Editions Essay Prize is open to all essays written in English of b...

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  • Christopher Hitchens

    For The Sake Of Argument

    $29.00

    The global turmoil of the late 1980s and early 1990s severely tested every analyst and commentator. Few wrote with such insight as Christopher Hitchens about the large events - or with such discernment and wit about the small tell-tale signs of a disordered culture. First published in 1993, the writings in For the Sake of Argument range from the political squalor of Washington to the twilight of Stalinizm in Prague, from the Jewish quarter of Damascus in the aftermath of the Gulf War to the e...

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  • Emily Rapp Black

    Frida Kahlo And My Left Leg

    $30.00

    Frida Kahlo and My Left Leg by New York Times bestselling author Emily Rapp Black is an amputee’s personal examination of how the experiences, art, and disabilities of Frida Kahlo shaped her life. At first sight of Kahlo’s painting The Two Fridas, Emily Rapp Black felt an instant connection with the artist. An amputee from childhood, Rapp Black grew up with a succession of prosthetic limbs, and learned that she had to hide her disability from the world. Kahlo sustained lifelong injuries after...

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    Virginia Woolf

    Genius And Ink

    $21.00

    Who better to serve as a guide to great books and their authors than Virginia Woolf? In the early years of its existence, the Times Literary Supplement published some of the finest writers in English: T. S. Eliot, Henry James and E. M. Forster among them. But one of the paper's defining voices was Virginia Woolf, who produced a string of superb essays between the two World Wars. The weirdness of Elizabethan plays, the pleasure of revisiting favourite novels, the supreme examples of Charlotte ...

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  • Barbara Ehrenreich

    Had I Known

    $24.00

    A self-proclaimed 'myth buster by trade', over her long-ranging career as a journalist and political activist Barbara Ehrenreich has delved with devastating wit and insight into the social and political fabric of America. Had I Known gathers together Ehrenreich's most significant articles and excerpts from the last four decades - some of which became the starting point for her bestselling books - from her award-winning article 'Welcome to Cancerland', published shortly after she was diagnosed...

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    A. A. Milne

    Happy Half-Hours

    $30.00

    A delightful selection of articles by the ever-popular A.A. Milne, many of which haven’t been in print for decades. Milne had a talent for regularly turning out a thousand whimsical words on lost hats and umbrellas, golf, married life, cheap cigars, and any amount of life’s other little difficulties. It also includes some of his fiercely argued writings on pacifism. Introduced by the prize-winning children’s author Frank Cottrell-Boyce, this volume features the very best of A.A. Milne in one ...

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  • Ernest Hemingway

    Hemingway On War

    $22.00

    A unique and captivating collection of Hemingway's writings on war, including extracts from his unparalleled war novels, some classic short stories, an extract from his only full-length play and a range of his war journalism. Ernest Hemingway witnessed many of the seminal conflicts of the twentieth century, as a Red Cross ambulance driver during the First World War and during his twenty-five years as a war correspondent. This edition offers an unparalleled portrayal of the physical and psycho...

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  • André Aciman

    Homo Irrealis

    $26.00

    The bestselling author of Find Me and Call Me by Your Name returns to the essay form with this collection of thoughts on time, the creative mind, and great lives and works. The irrealis mood knows no boundaries between what is and what isn't, between what happened and what won't. In more ways than one, the essay about the artists, writers, and great minds gathered in this volume have nothing to do with who I am, or who they were, and my reading of them may be entirely erroneous. But I misread...

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    Wayne Koestenbaum

    Hotel Theory

    $31.00

    Hotel Theory is two books in one: a meditation on the meaning of hotels, and a dime novel (Hotel Women) featuring Lana Turner and Liberace. Typical of Wayne Koestenbaum’s invigoratingly inventive style, the two books — one fiction, one nonfiction — run concurrently, in twin columns, and the articles “a,” “an,” and “the” never appear. The nonfiction ruminations on hotels are divided into eight dossiers, composed of short takes on the presence of hotels in the author’s dreams as well as in lite...

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  • David Rattray

    How I Became One Of The Invisible

    $27.00

    Since its first publication in 1992, David Rattray's How I Became One of the Invisible has functioned as a kind of secret history and guidebook to a poetic and mystical tradition running through Western civilization from Pythagoras to In Nomine music to Hölderlin and Antonin Artaud. Rattray not only excavated this tradition, he embodied and lived it. He studied at Harvard and the Sorbonne but remained a poet, outside the academy. His stories “Van” and “The Angel” chronicle his travels in sout...

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  • The School of Life

    How To Find Love

    $21.00

    Choosing a partner is one of the most consequential and tricky decisions we will ever make. The cost of repeated failure is immense. And yet we are often so alone with the search. Partners used to be found for us by parents and society. Now we are expected to follow our feelings - and so locate people by ourselves, according to intuition. This should be an improvement, but our emotions often pull us towards hugely problematic characters and dynamics. How to Find Love explains why we have the ...

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    The School of Life

    How To Reform Capitalism

    $21.00

    It is quite normal to feel frustrated and sorrowful about aspects of modern capitalism, but realistic hope of change can seem either utopian or demented. In fact, the way that capitalism works is inherently open to alteration and improvement. This is because the problems of capitalism are, in their essence, not about money, law or politics, but about human psychology - the field of expertise of The School of Life. As this hugely original essay argues, the path to a better sort of capitalism s...

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  • Elif Shafak

    How To Stay Sane In An Age Of Division

    $10.00

    It feels like the world is falling apart. So how do we keep hold of our optimism? How do we nurture the parts of ourselves that hope, trust and believe in something better? And how can we stay sane in this world of division? In this beautifully written and illuminating polemic, Booker Prize nominee Elif Shafak reflects on our age of pessimism, when emotions guide and misguide our politics, and misinformation and fear are the norm. A tender, uplifting plea for optimism, Shafak draws on her own...

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    The School of Life

    How To Travel

    $21.00

    An original and comprehensive look at what it is we seek when we set off on an adventure abroad - and at how we can travel better, so that our experiences overseas become truly transformative and memorable. Going travelling is one of the few things we undertake in a direct attempt to make ourselves happy - and frequently, in fascinating ways, we fail. We get bored, cross, anxious or lonely. It isn't surprising: our societies act as if going travelling were simple, just a case of handing over ...

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    Alexander Chee

    How To Write An Autobiographical Novel

    $29.00

    As a novelist, Alexander Chee has been described as “masterful” by Roxane Gay, “incendiary” by the New York Times, and "brilliant" by the Washington Post. With How to Write an Autobiographical Novel, his first collection of nonfiction, he’s sure to secure his place as one of the finest essayists of his generation as well. How to Write an Autobiographical Novel is the author’s manifesto on the entangling of life, literature, and politics, and how the lessons learned from a life spent reading a...

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  • Wayne Koestenbaum

    Humiliation

    $30.00

    Endlessly surprising and entertaining, Humiliation is an essay-in-fragments unlike any other you will read on the human condition. With a disarming blend of personal reflec­tion and cultural commentary, Wayne Koestenbaum walks us – at times cajoles us – through a spectrum of mortifications, in history, current events, literature, art, music, film, and in his own life. The book’s timing, the New York Times tells us, “is flawless.” Hardback: 216 PagesProduct Dimensions: 120 x 190 mmISBN: 978190...

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  • Susan Sontag

    Illness As Metaphor

    $29.00

    Sontag wrote Illness as Metaphor in 1978, while suffering from breast cancer herself. In her study she reveals that the metaphors and myths surrounding certain illnesses, especially cancer, add greatly to the suffering of the patients and often inhibit them from seeking proper treatment. By demystifying the fantasies surrounding cancer, Sontag shows cancer for what it is - a disease; not a curse, not a punishment, certainly not an embarrassment, and highly curable, if good treatment is found ...

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  • Amitav Ghosh

    In An Antique Land

    $26.00

    In an Antique Land is a subversive history in the guise of a traveller's tale. When the author stumbles across a slave narrative in the margins of an ancient text, his curiosity is piqued. What follows is a ten year search, which brings author and slave together across 800 hundred years of colonial history. Bursting with anecdote and exuberant detail, it offers a magical, intimate biography of the private life of a country, Egypt, from the Crusades to Operation Desert Storm.Paperback: 400 Pag...

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    Margaret Atwood

    In Other Worlds

    $29.00

    In these marvelously wide-ranging essays, Margaret Atwood explores her lifelong relationship to science fiction, as a reader and as a writer. At a time when the borders between genres are increasingly porous, she maps the fertile crosscurrents of speculative and science fiction, utopias, dystopias, slipstream, and fantasy, musing on the age-old human impulse to imagine new worlds. She shares the evolution of her personal fascination with SF, from her childhood invention of a race of flying su...

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    Daunt Books

    In The Garden

    $21.00

    Outdoor space is something everyone should have access to. But you don’t need a garden to become a gardener. Growing plants and vegetables forces us to pause, pay attention and look more closely. From the vantage point of even the smallest windowsill garden we can observe the passing of time through the shifting of the seasons, as well as the environmental changes the planet is undergoing. In this collection of essays, fourteen writers go beyond simply considering a plot of soil to explore ho...

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  • Daunt Books

    In The Kitchen

    $21.00

    Food can embody our personal history as well as wider cultural histories. But what are the stories we tell ourselves about the kitchen, and how do we first come to it? How do the cookbooks we read shape us? Can cooking be a tool for connection in the kitchen and outside of it? In these essays thirteen writers consider the subjects of cooking and eating and how they shape our lives, and the possibilities and limitations the kitchen poses. Rachel Roddy traces an alternative personal history thr...

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  • Karl Ove Knausgaard

    In The Land Of The Cyclops

    $40.00

    Translated by Martin Aitken In the Land of the Cyclops is Karl Ove Knausgaard's first collection of essays to be published in English, and these brilliant and wide-ranging pieces meditate on themes familiar from his groundbreaking fiction. Here, Knausgaard discusses Madame Bovary, the Northern Lights, Ingmar Bergman, and the work of an array of writers and visual artists, including Knut Hamsun, Michel Houellebecq, Anselm Kiefer and Cindy Sherman. These essays beautifully capture Knausgaard's ...

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  • Adam Phillips

    In Writing

    $21.00

    For Adam Phillips - as for Freud and many of his followers - poetry and poets have always held an essential place, as both precursors and unofficial collaborators in the psychoanalytic project. But the same has never held true in reverse. What, Phillips wonders, at the start of this deeply engaging book, has psychoanalysis meant for writers? And what can writing do for psychoanalysis? Phillips explores these questions through an exhilarating series of encounters with - and vivid readings of -...

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  • Elena Ferrante

    Incidental Inventions

    $35.00

    Translated by Ann GoldsteinIllustrated by Andrea Ucini Elena Ferrante is the best-selling author of My Brilliant Friend, now an HBO original series. Collected here for the first time are the seeds of future novels, the timely reflections of this internationally beloved storyteller, the abiding preoccupations of a writer who has been called "one of the great novelists of our time" (New York Times). "This is my last column, after a year that has scared and inspired me... I have written as an au...

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    Zadie Smith

    Intimations

    $12.50

    Deeply personal and powerfully moving, a short and timely series of reflective essays by one of the most clear-sighted and essential writers of our time. Written during the early months of lockdown, Intimations explores ideas and questions prompted by an unprecedented situation. What does it mean to submit to a new reality--or to resist it? How do we compare relative sufferings? What is the relationship between time and work? In our isolation, what do other people mean to us? How do we think ...

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  • Osip Mandelstam

    Journey To Armenia

    $30.00

    Osip Mandelstam visited Armenia in 1930, and during the eight months of his stay he rediscovered his poetic voice and was inspired to write an experimental meditation on the country and its ancient culture. 'Armenia brought him back to his true self, a self depending on the "inner ear" which could never play a poet false. There was everything congenial to him in this country of red and ochre landscape, ancient churches, and resonant pottery.' – Henry Gifford Conversation about Dante, Mandelst...

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  • Rem Koolhaas and Hal Foster

    Junkspace With Running Room

    $30.00

    In Junkspace, architect Rem Koolhaas itemised in delirious detail how our cities are being overwhelmed. His celebrated jeremiad is here updated and twinned with Running Room, a fresh response from architectural critic Hal Foster. ‘The manifesto is a modernist mode, one that looks to the future… Junkspace makes no such claim: “Architecture disappeared in the twentieth century,” states Koolhaas matter-of-factly. Junkspace does a harder thing: it “foretells” the present, which is to say that it ...

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    Salman Rushdie

    Languages Of Truth

    $29.00

    Salman Rushdie is celebrated as a storyteller of the highest order, illuminating deep truths about our society and culture through his gorgeous, often searing, prose. Now, in his latest collection of nonfiction, he brings together insightful and inspiring essays, criticism, and speeches that focus on his relationship with the written word, and solidify his place as one of the most original thinkers of our time. Gathering pieces written between 2003 and 2020, Languages of Truth chronicles Rush...

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  • Lauren Hough

    Leaving Isn't The Hardest Thing

    $29.00

    As an adult, Lauren Hough has had many identities: an airman in the U.S. Air Force, a cable guy, a bouncer at a gay club. As a child, however, she had none. Growing up as a member of the infamous cult The Children of God, Hough had her own self robbed from her. The cult took her all over the globe–to Germany, Japan, Texas, Chile—but it wasn’t until she finally left for good that Lauren understood she could have a life beyond “The Family.” Along the way, she’s loaded up her car and started ove...

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  • Shirley Jackson

    Let Me Tell You

    $25.00

    Let Me Tell You brings together the brilliantly eerie short stories Jackson is best known for with frank and inspiring lectures on writing; comic essays she wrote about her large, rowdy family; and revelatory personal letters and drawings. Jackson's landscape here is most frequently domestic - dinner parties, children's games and neighbourly gossip - but one that is continually threatened and subverted in her unsettling, inimitable prose. This collection is the first opportunity to see Shirle...

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  • Joan Didion

    Let Me Tell You What I Mean

    $28.00

    From one of our most iconic and influential writers: a timeless collection of mostly early pieces that reveal what would become Joan Didion's subjects, including the press, politics, California robber barons, women, and her own self-doubt. These twelve pieces from 1968 to 2000, never before gathered together, offer an illuminating glimpse into the mind and process of a legendary figure. They showcase Joan Didion's incisive reporting, her empathetic gaze, and her role as "an articulate witness...

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    Shirley Jackson

    Life Among The Savages

    $22.00

    As well as being a master of the macabre, Shirley Jackson was also a pitch-perfect chronicler of everyday family life. In Life Among the Savages, her caustically funny account of raising her children in a ramshackle house in Vermont, she deals with rats in the cellar, misbehaving imaginary friends, an oblivious husband and ever-encroaching domestic chaos, all described with wit, warmth and plenty of bite.Paperback: 240 PagesProduct Dimensions: 129 x 198 mm ISBN: 9780241387801 Published by Pen...

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    Jenny Minton

    Lolita In The Afterlife

    $29.00

    A vibrant collection of sharp and essential modern pieces on Vladimir Nabokov’s perennially provocative book—with original contributions from a stellar cast of prominent twenty-first century writers. In 1958, Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita was published in the United States to immediate controversy and bestsellerdom. More than sixty years later, this phenomenal novel generates as much buzz as it did when originally published. Central to countless issues at the forefront of our national discourse—a...

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  • Jo Glanville

    Looking For An Enemy

    $21.00

    Conspiracy theories about Jews are back in the mainstream. The Pittsburgh gunman who murdered 11 people in a synagogue claimed that 'filthy evil' Jews were bringing 'filthy evil' Muslims into America. The billionaire philanthropist George Soros has been accused of supporting 'white genocide'. Labour Party members have claimed that Israel is behind ISIS. The belief that Jews are plotting against society never dies, it just adapts to suit the times: from medieval accusations that Jews murder Ch...

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  • Christopher Hitchens

    Love, Poverty And War

    $29.00

    Love, Poverty and War: Journeys and Essays showcases the Hitchens' rejection of consensus and cliche, whether he's reporting from abroad in Indonesia, Kurdistan, Iraq, North Korea, or Cuba, or when his pen is targeted mercilessly at the likes of William Clinton, Mother Theresa ("a fanatic, a fundamentalist and a fraud"), the Dalai Lama, Noam Chomsky, Mel Gibson and Michael Bloomberg. Hitchens began the nineties as a "darling of the left" but has become more of an "unaffiliated radical" whose ...

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  • Leslie Jamison

    Make It Scream, Make It Burn

    $35.00

    A profound exploration of the oceanic depths of longing and obsession, Make It Scream, Make It Burn is a book about why and how we tell stories. It takes the reader deep into the lives of strangers - from a woman healed by the song of 'the loneliest whale in the world' to a family convinced their child is a reincarnation of a lost pilot - and asks how we can bear witness to the changing truths of other's lives while striving to find a deeper connection to the complexities of our own.Paperback...

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  • Michael Chabon

    Maps And Legends

    $88.00

    Maps and Legends is an essay collection by American author Michael Chabon that was scheduled for official release on May 1, 2008, although some copies shipped two weeks early from various online bookstores. The book is Chabon's first book-length foray into nonfiction, with 16 essays, some previously published. Several of these essays are defenses of the author's work in genre literature (such as science fiction, fantasy, and comics), while others are more autobiographical, explaining how the ...

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  • Andrew Lees

    Mentored By A Madman

    $30.00

    In this extraordinary memoir, neuroscientist Andrew Lees explains how William Burroughs, author of Naked Lunch and troubled drug addict, played an unlikely part in his medical career. Lees draws on Burroughs search for an addiction cure to discover a ground-breaking treatment for shaking palsy, and learns how to use the deductive reasoning of Sherlock Holmes to diagnose patients. Lees follows Burroughs into the rainforest and under the influence of yagé (ayahuasca) gains insights that encoura...

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  • Will Harris

    Mixed-Race Superman

    $27.00

    Mixed-Race Superman is a reflection on the lives of two very different supermen: Barack Obama and Keanu Reeves. In an era where a man endorsed by the Ku Klux Klan can sit in the White House, Will Harris argues that the mixed-race background of each gave them a shapelessness that was a form of resistance. Drawing on his own personal experience and examining the way that these two men have been embedded in our collective consciousness, Harris asks what they can teach us about race and heroism.P...

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    Roland Barthes

    Mourning Diary

    $30.00

    The French critic Roland Barthes has guru status among literary theorists. This private diary opens the door onto his strange personal world, recording, day-by-day, the impact of bereavement as he struggled to live without the most important person in his life: his mother. Introduced by Professor Michael Wood. Hardback: 256 PagesProduct Dimensions: 120 x 190 mmISBN: 9781907903106 Published by Notting Hill Editions

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  • Wayne Koestenbaum

    My 1980s & Other Essays

    $27.00

    Wayne Koestenbaum has been described as an impossible lovechild from a late-night, drunken three-way between Joan Didion, Roland Barthes, and Susan Sontag (Bidoun). In My 1980s and Other Essays, a collection of extravagant range and style, he rises to the challenge of that improbable description. My 1980s and Other Essays opens with a series of manifestos--or, perhaps more appropriately, a series of impassioned disclosures, intellectual and personal. It then proceeds to wrestle with a series ...

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  • Charles Dickens

    Night Walks

    $15.00

    Charles Dickens describes in Night Walks his time as an insomniac, when he decided to cure himself by walking through London in the small hours, and discovered homelessness, drunkenness and vice on the streets. This collection of essays shows Dickens as one of the greatest visionaries of the city in all its variety and cruelty.Paperback: 128 pagesProduct Dimensions: 111 x 181 mmISBN: 9780141047508Published by Penguin Books

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  • Adam Mars-Jones

    Noriko Smiling

    $30.00

    “Late Spring, directed and co-written by Yasujiro Ozu, was released in 1949, which makes it an old film, or a film that has been new for a long time…” So begins this remarkable essay in narrative reconstruction. Film-critic, novelist and essayist Mars-Jones gives a virtuoso performance as the lost figure of film explainer, drawing out a host of meaning from the reticence of Ozu’s classic Japanese movie. “So long after its first release Late Spring is still limber and elusive,” enthuses Mars-J...

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  • James Baldwin

    Notes Of A Native Son

    $19.00

    The story of the negro in America is the story of America... it is not a very pretty story' James Baldwin's breakthrough essay collection made him the voice of his generation. Ranging over Harlem in the 1940s, movies, novels, his preacher father and his experiences of Paris, they capture the complexity of black life at the dawn of the civil rights movement with effervescent wit and prophetic wisdom. Paperback: 208 PagesProduct Dimensions: 129 x 198 mmISBN: 9780241334003 Published by Penguin B...

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  • Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

    Notes On Grief

    $22.00

    'Grief is a cruel kind of education. You learn how ungentle mourning can be, how full of anger. You learn how glib condolences can feel. You learn how much grief is about language, the failure of language and the grasping for language' On 10 June 2020, the scholar James Nwoye Adichie died suddenly in Nigeria. In this tender and powerful essay, expanded from the original New Yorker text, his daughter, a self-confessed daddy's girl, remembers her beloved father. Notes on Grief is at once a trib...

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  • Erik Anderson

    Object Lessons: Bird

    $21.00

    Hope, as Emily Dickinson famously wrote, is the thing with feathers. Erik Anderson, on the other hand, regards our obsession with birds as too sentimental, too precious. Birds don't express hope. They express themselves. But this tension between the versions of nature that lodge in our minds and the realities that surround us is the central theme of Bird. This is no field guide. It's something far more unusual and idiosyncratic, balancing science with story, anatomy with metaphor, habitat wit...

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  • Kara Thompson

    Object Lessons: Blanket

    $21.00

    We are born into blankets. They keep us alive and they cover us in death. We pull and tug on blankets to see us through the night or an illness. They shield us in mourning and witness our most intimate pleasures. Curious, fearless, vulnerable, and critical, Blanket interweaves cultural critique with memoir to cast new light on a ubiquitous object. Kara Thompson reveals blankets everywhere--film, art, geology, disasters, battlefields, resistance, home--and transforms an ordinary thing into a v...

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  • Lydia Pyne

    Object Lessons: Bookshelf

    $21.00

    Every shelf is different and every bookshelf tells a different story. One bookshelf can creak with character in a bohemian coffee shop and another can groan with gravitas in the Library of Congress. Writer and historian Lydia Pyne finds bookshelves to be holders not just of books but of so many other things: values, vibes, and verbs that can be contained and displayed in the buildings and rooms of contemporary human existence. With a shrewd eye toward this particular moment in the history of ...

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